Charlotte Bronte's Victorian novel, Jane Eyre, reaches the screen in a drama that is as intense on celluloid as it is on the printed page. This picture has taken liberties with the novel that may be chalked off to cinematic expediency, but there is, nonetheless, a certain script articulation that closer heed to the book could possibly not have achieved.

Charlotte Bronte’s Victorian novel, Jane Eyre, reaches the screen in a drama that is as intense on celluloid as it is on the printed page. This picture has taken liberties with the novel that may be chalked off to cinematic expediency, but there is, nonetheless, a certain script articulation that closer heed to the book could possibly not have achieved.

Jane Eyre is the story of a girl who, after a childhood during which she was buffeted about in an orphanage, secures a position as governess to the ward of one Edward Rochester, sire of an English manor house called Thornfield. Jane Eyre eventually falls in love with him, and he with her. When their wedding is interrupted by a man who accuses Rochester of already being married, there is divulged the secret that Rochester has kept for many years.

Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles are excellent, though the latter is frequently inaudible in the slur of his lines. It is a large cast and one that acquits itself well. Notable in the support are Henry Daniell, as Brocklehurst, the cruel overseer of the orphanage; Margaret O’Brien, the ward of Rochester.

Jane Eyre

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Robert Stevenson; Producer William Goetz (exec.); Screenplay Aldous Huxley, Robert Stevenson, John Houseman; Camera George Barnes; Editor Walter Thompson; Music Bernard Herrmann; Art Director William Pereira

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1944. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

Orson Welles Joan Fontaine Margaret O'Brien Peggy Ann Garner Agnes Moorehead Elizabeth Taylor
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