Everything about this William Perlberg production is showmanly appealing. The casting is tiptop, with Robert Young, as the Police Gazette reporter, the romantic vis-a-vis after forcing Betty Grable to jilt Reginald Gardner, cast as an honorably enamored English duke whom she had met in London. Adolphe Menjou is the volatile Gazette ed, but the rest of the cast is also-ran save for Virginia Grey as the star's pal and Phil Regan, marking his cinematic comeback effectively in a songsmithing role.

Everything about this William Perlberg production is showmanly appealing. The casting is tiptop, with Robert Young, as the Police Gazette reporter, the romantic vis-a-vis after forcing Betty Grable to jilt Reginald Gardner, cast as an honorably enamored English duke whom she had met in London. Adolphe Menjou is the volatile Gazette ed, but the rest of the cast is also-ran save for Virginia Grey as the star’s pal and Phil Regan, marking his cinematic comeback effectively in a songsmithing role.

Apart from Maude Nugent’s classic title song, and sundry other excerpts such as the opener, ‘Here Am I Waiting at the Church’, the tunes by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren are zestful and certain of popularity. They fit the action well, and in the person of pseudo-songwriting Regan, who does handsomely while tenoring the tunes he has ‘just written’, they are given excellent demonstration throughout.

A saucy title that ‘if you think the Gay 90s were gay, get a load of the 1880s’ – or words to that effect – sets the pace well.

Sweet Rosie O'Grady

Production

20th Century-Fox. Director Irving Cummings; Producer William Perlberg; Screenplay Ken Englund; Camera Ernest Palmer; Editor Robert Simpson; Music Alfred Newman, Charles Henderson (dir.)

Crew

(Color) Extract of a review from 1943. Running time: 76 MIN.

With

Betty Grable Robert Young Adolphe Menjou Virginia Grey Phil Regan

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