Review: ‘Saratoga Trunk’

Story has color, romance, adventure, and not a little s.a. Ingrid Bergman is the beautiful albeit calculating Creole, and Gary Cooper is very effective in the plausible role of a droll, gamblin' Texan who has the romantic hex on the headstrong Creole. Flora Robson is capitally cast as her body-servant and Jerry Austin does a bangup job as the dwarf who, with the mulatto servant, make a strange entourage.

Story has color, romance, adventure, and not a little s.a. Ingrid Bergman is the beautiful albeit calculating Creole, and Gary Cooper is very effective in the plausible role of a droll, gamblin’ Texan who has the romantic hex on the headstrong Creole. Flora Robson is capitally cast as her body-servant and Jerry Austin does a bangup job as the dwarf who, with the mulatto servant, make a strange entourage.

The 1875 period, and the New Orleans and Saratoga locales, combine into a moving story [from Edna Ferber’s novel] as Bergman returns from Paris to avenge her mother’s ‘shame’. That this is a spurious sentimentality, considering she was born out of wedlock, and her father’s family sought to banish her virtually to France, is beside the point. Bergman, as fetching in a brunette wig as in her natural lighter tresses, takes command in every scene. She sparks the cinematurgy, a vital plus factor considering Cooper’s laconic personation, and the sultry reticence of her two curious servants.

The two major geographical segments – her native NO and the fertile Saratoga – are replete with basic action and never pall.

1946: Nomination: Best Supp. Actress (Flora Robson)

Saratoga Trunk

Production

Warner. Director Sam Wood; Producer Hal B. Wallis; Screenplay Casey Robinson; Camera Ernest Haller; Editor Ralph Dawson; Music Max Steiner; Art Director Joseph St. Amand

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1943. Running time: 135 MIN.

With

Gary Cooper Ingrid Bergman Flora Robson Jerry Austin John Warburton Florence Bates
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