Familiar story is used principally as background for the Ritzes' shenanigans, variety numbers and Langford's neat warbling. Ritz Bros pose as Chicago mobsters, taking job at a NY nightclub under the impression they've been hired on their vaude rep as 'the Three Funny Bunnies'. When they learn that Mary Beth Hughes is a femme pickpocket hired by the nitery operator to pass the stolen jewels to them, the whacky trio attempts to duck out. Romance concerns the nightclub singer (Frances Langford) and a socialite.

Familiar story is used principally as background for the Ritzes’ shenanigans, variety numbers and Langford’s neat warbling. Ritz Bros pose as Chicago mobsters, taking job at a NY nightclub under the impression they’ve been hired on their vaude rep as ‘the Three Funny Bunnies’. When they learn that Mary Beth Hughes is a femme pickpocket hired by the nitery operator to pass the stolen jewels to them, the whacky trio attempts to duck out. Romance concerns the nightclub singer (Frances Langford) and a socialite.

The nitery sequences offer the excuse to introduce the Igor-Pogi ballroom team and Rogers Dancers, both excellent. Production values are remarkably lavish for this type of picture. Jack LaRue, one of the nightclub’s strong-arm boys, goes in for some comedy, but still remains the toughie menace.

Never a Dull Moment

Production

Universal. Director Edward Lilley; Producer Howard Benedict; Screenplay Mel Ronson, Stanley Roberts; Camera Charles Van Enger; Editor Paul Landron; Music Hans J. Salter

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1943. Running time: 60 MIN.

With

Harry Ritz Al Ritz Jimmy Ritz Frances Langford Mary Beth Hughes Jack LaRue
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