Harry Tugend's screenplay closely follows the Herbert and Dorothy Fields-Cole Porter [1941] musical, which in turn had basic similarities to the play Cradle Snatchers, with the writers of that, Norma Mitchell and Russell G. Medcraft, included in the screen credit. The yarn is about a wacky soldier, who, with two pals, gets involved with three a.k. dames figuring to get revenge on their philandering husbands by hiring soldiers as consorts.

Harry Tugend’s screenplay closely follows the Herbert and Dorothy Fields-Cole Porter [1941] musical, which in turn had basic similarities to the play Cradle Snatchers, with the writers of that, Norma Mitchell and Russell G. Medcraft, included in the screen credit. The yarn is about a wacky soldier, who, with two pals, gets involved with three a.k. dames figuring to get revenge on their philandering husbands by hiring soldiers as consorts.

Tugend, however, has managed to inject many more laughs than were in the Broadway musical click, which was highlighted by Danny Kaye’s delivery of ‘Melody in 4-F’, replaced here with a Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number, ‘Who Did? I Did, Yes I did’. The laughs, in fact, come so often and so fast as to be stepping on one another, with the audience estimated as missing 25% of the gags.

Bob Hope, a master at fast vaudeville timing of comedy material, and Betty Hutton, glamorized to an unprecedented degree for a hoydenish singer, are an okay romantic team. They are given better than average support by Cully Richards and Dave Willock, as Hope’s pals; and Eve Arden, who was in the Broadway cast.

Let's Face It

Production

Paramount. Director Sidney Lanfield; Producer Fred Kohlmar; Screenplay Harry Tugend; Camera Lionel Lindon

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1943. Running time: 76 MIN.

With

Bob Hope Betty Hutton ZaSu Pitts Eve Arden
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