From the novel of Eric Knight, and with Fred M. Wilcox directing his first feature picture, Lassie emerges as nice entertainment enhanced by color photography and good scenic shots.

From the novel of Eric Knight, and with Fred M. Wilcox directing his first feature picture, Lassie emerges as nice entertainment enhanced by color photography and good scenic shots.

One of the film’s major assets is its cast, good from top to bottom. Lassie, a beautiful collie, is given a great deal of camera attention and is docile, if not extraordinarily trained. The dog is the focal point for a great deal of pathos.

Her Yorkshire owner (Donald Crisp) sells her to the lord of the manor, thus depriving his son (Roddy McDowall) of his bosom companion. The dog escapes a couple of times to rejoin McDowall, then finally makes a trek of hundreds of miles from Scotland to England to get back to the kid.

The sentimental angles are something akin to McDowall’s My Friend Flicka but the kid is a solid trouper. Crisp, as his father, is excellent; ditto Elsa Lanchester, playing McDowall’s mother.

Considering this is Wilcox’s first effort with a feature film, his work is promising. His characters are believable and that’s especially important in a film of this type.

Lassie Come Home

Production

M-G-M. Director Fred M. Wilcox; Producer Samuel Marx; Screenplay Hugo Butler; Camera Leonard Smith; Editor Ben Lewis; Music Daniele Amfitheatrof

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1943. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Roddy McDowall Donald Crisp May Whitty Edmund Gwenn Elsa Lanchester Elizabeth Taylor
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