Review: ‘The Pride of the Yankees’

Sam Goldwyn has produced a stirring epitaph on Lou Gehrig. For baseball and non-baseball fan alike, this sentimental, romantic saga of the NY kid who rose to the baseball heights and later met such a tragic end is well worth seeing. Clever fictionizing and underplaying of the actual sport in contrast to the more human, domestic side of the great ballplayer make the film good for all audiences.

Sam Goldwyn has produced a stirring epitaph on Lou Gehrig. For baseball and non-baseball fan alike, this sentimental, romantic saga of the NY kid who rose to the baseball heights and later met such a tragic end is well worth seeing. Clever fictionizing and underplaying of the actual sport in contrast to the more human, domestic side of the great ballplayer make the film good for all audiences.

Gary Cooper makes his Gehrig look and sound believable from the screen.

To the credit of the screenwriters, and Paul Gallico who wrote the original, no attempt is made to inject color into the characterization of Gehrig. He’s depicted for what he was, a quiet, plodding personality who strived for and achieved perfection in his profession.

1942: Best Editing.

Nominations: Best Picture, Actor (Gary Cooper), Actress (Teresa Wright), Original Story, Screenplay, B&W Cinematography, #B&W Art Direction, Scoring of a Dramatic Picture, Sound, Special Effects

The Pride of the Yankees

Production

RKO/Goldwyn. Director Sam Wood; Producer Sam Goldwyn; Screenplay Jo Swerling, Herman J. Mankiewicz; Camera Rudolph Mate; Editor Daniel Mandell; Music Leigh Harline; Art Director William Cameron Menzies

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1942. Running time: 120 MIN.

With

Gary Cooper Teresa Wright Babe Ruth Walter Brennan Dan Duryea Elsa Jansen
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