Morocco is a bubbling spontaneous entertainment without a semblance of sanity; an uproarious patchquilt of gags, old situations and a blitz-like laugh pace that never lets up for a moment. It's Bing Crosby and Bob Hope at their best, with Dorothy Lamour, as usual, the pivotal point for their romantic pitch.

Morocco is a bubbling spontaneous entertainment without a semblance of sanity; an uproarious patchquilt of gags, old situations and a blitz-like laugh pace that never lets up for a moment. It’s Bing Crosby and Bob Hope at their best, with Dorothy Lamour, as usual, the pivotal point for their romantic pitch.

The story’s absurdities, all of which are predicated on Crosby and Hope as shipwrecked stowaways cast ashore on the coast of North Africa, at no time weave a pattern of restraint. It’s just a madcap holiday for the fun-makers.

The scripters, along with everyone else associated with the production, must surely have realized, of course, that the yarn couldn’t be played straight. The result is some unorthodox film-making that finds both male stars making dialogistic asides that kid, for instance, some of the film’s ‘weaknesses’ or, in other cases, poke fun at various objects that aren’t even remotely associated with the picture.

1942: Nominations: Best Original Screenplay, Sound

Road to Morocco

Production

Paramount. Director David Butler; Producer Paul Jones (assoc.); Screenplay Frank Butler, Don Hartman; Camera William C. Mellor; Editor Irene Morra; Art Director Hans Dreier, Robert Usher

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1942. Running time: 83 MIN.

With

Bing Crosby Bob Hope Dorothy Lamour Anthony Quinn Vladimir Sokoloff Dona Drake
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