Reunion is another one of those dramas cooked up about the subjugation of the French by the German conquerors. Starting out with some promise, it falls apart at the halfway point. Attempts to generate a hot triangular romance with Joan Crawford as the pivot prove very tepid.

Reunion is another one of those dramas cooked up about the subjugation of the French by the German conquerors. Starting out with some promise, it falls apart at the halfway point. Attempts to generate a hot triangular romance with Joan Crawford as the pivot prove very tepid.

Story [from an original by Ladislas Bus-Fekete] opens just prior to move-in of the Germans to Paris, with rich playgirl Crawford engaged to French patriot and arms manufacturer Philip Dorn. On fall of the city, girl discovers that her intended is a renegade cooperating to the fullest with the Nazis. Disillusioned, she hides John Wayne, who has eluded the Gestapo, and gradually falls in love with him.

Direction by Jules Dassin lacks smoothness in pace, and dwells too long in many spots on character development and minor incidents.

Reunion

Production

M-G-M. Director Jules Dassin; Producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz; Screenplay Jan Lustig, Marvin Borowsky, Marc Connolly; Camera Robert Planke; Editor Elmo Veron; Music Franz Waxman

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1942. Running time: 101 MIN.

With

Joan Crawford John Wayne Philip Dorn Reginald Owen Albert Basserman John Carradine
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