In essence, Underground is merely another violent attack on the barbarism of Nazism, with elements of the chase, minor romance and a gleam of hope at the finale. It has the urgency of an overpowering subject, with the usual Warner punch. It's a potent picture.

In essence, Underground is merely another violent attack on the barbarism of Nazism, with elements of the chase, minor romance and a gleam of hope at the finale. It has the urgency of an overpowering subject, with the usual Warner punch. It’s a potent picture.

Yarn deals with the underground anti-Nazi movement in the Reich, specifically, with the outlaw shortwave radio stations that help to spread the voice of truth and freedom and thus keep Nazi officialdom in a state of frenzy. It’s a story of brother-against-brother, of a forbidden love between a young, idealistic Nazi zealot and a girl member of the underground movement, and of a tragic death of several leaders of the group serving to open the eyes of the hero to the real evil of Nazism.

From a scripting, production, direction and acting standpoint, Underground is a sincere effort. It has the integrity that indicates its makers believed in what they were doing. Jeffrey Lynn, Philip Dorn and Kaaren Verne are undeniably persuasive as the young leads.

Underground

Production

Warner. Director Vincent Sherman; Producer William Jacobs; Screenplay Edwin Justus Mayer, Oliver H.P. Garrett; Camera Sid Hickox; Editor Thomas Pratt; Music Adolph Deutsch

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1941. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Jeffrey Lynn Philip Dorn Kaaren Verne Mona Maris Frank Reicher Martin Kosleck
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