Dumas story of the Corsican Brothers is widely known. Born Siamese twins of Corsican aristocracy, the babies are separated immediately after birth by a miraculous operation, and saved from a vendetta attack that kills their parents and immediate relatives. One child goes to Paris for upbringing and education, while the other remains to be reared by a former family servant.

Dumas story of the Corsican Brothers is widely known. Born Siamese twins of Corsican aristocracy, the babies are separated immediately after birth by a miraculous operation, and saved from a vendetta attack that kills their parents and immediate relatives. One child goes to Paris for upbringing and education, while the other remains to be reared by a former family servant.

Twenty-one years later the twins (both portrayed by Douglas Fairbanks Jr) are reunited, introduced, and informed of the enemy of their forebears. Swearing to avenge the family murders, the two boys separate to confuse their enemy with widely separated attacks on his henchmen.

Title foreword warns audiences that this is an incredible tale – and then the picture proceeds on that basis. Script [from a free adaptation by George Bruce and Howard Estabrook] is well set up to display the action qualities, but rather studious on the dialog and story motivation. Gregory Ratoff’s direction is okay.

The Corsican Brothers

Production

Small/United Artists. Director Gregory Ratoff; Producer Edward Small; Screenplay George Bruce; Camera Harry Stradling; Editor Grant Whytock, William Claxton; Music Dimitri Tiomkin;; Art Director Nicolai Remisoff

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1941. Running time: 111 MIN.

With

Douglas Fairbanks Jr Ruth Warrick Akim Tamiroff J. Carrol Naish H.B. Warner Henry Wilcoxon

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