Review: ‘Shadow of the Thin Man’

Much of the farcical flavor which characterized the earlier Thin Man films is reclaimed in the new picture. On the sentimental side, William Powell and Myrna Loy get a great deal of fun from their first appearance as parents of a four-year son, who has a way of asking embarrassing questions. For excitement the couple find themselves in the middle of an investigation into racetrack gambling, in the course of which there are three homicides, half a dozen suspects and a bit of gunplay.

Much of the farcical flavor which characterized the earlier Thin Man films is reclaimed in the new picture. On the sentimental side, William Powell and Myrna Loy get a great deal of fun from their first appearance as parents of a four-year son, who has a way of asking embarrassing questions. For excitement the couple find themselves in the middle of an investigation into racetrack gambling, in the course of which there are three homicides, half a dozen suspects and a bit of gunplay.

Harry Kurnitz has fashioned the story with a good deal of ingenuity, using the characters of the private detective and his wife, as created in the original yarn by Dashiell Hammett.

Sam Levene, as a police lieutenant, is particularly amusing. Stella Adler is a stunning blonde heavy, and the character bits by Lou Lubin, Joseph Anthony, Alan Baxter and Loring Smith add some reality to the seamy side of the action. With much to work with, W.S. Van Dyke has directed with speed.

Shadow of the Thin Man

Production

M-G-M. Director W.S. Van Dyke; Producer Hunt Stromberg; Screenplay Irving Brecher, Harry Kurnitz; Camera William Daniels; Editor Robert J. Kern; Music David Snell; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Paul Groesse

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1941. Running time: 97 MIN.

With

William Powell Myrna Loy Barry Nelson Donna Reed Sam Levene Alan Baxter
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