Review: ‘Road to Singapore’

Initial teaming of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope in Road to Singapore provides foundation for continuous round of good substantial comedy of rapid-fire order, swinging along at a zippy pace. Contrast is provided in Crosby's leisurely presentation of situations and dialog, in comparison to the lightning-like thrusts and parries of Hope. Neat blending of the two brands accentuates the comedy values for laugh purposes.

Initial teaming of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope in Road to Singapore provides foundation for continuous round of good substantial comedy of rapid-fire order, swinging along at a zippy pace. Contrast is provided in Crosby’s leisurely presentation of situations and dialog, in comparison to the lightning-like thrusts and parries of Hope. Neat blending of the two brands accentuates the comedy values for laugh purposes.

Story [by Harry Hervey] is a light framework on which to drape the situations for Crosby and Hope, with Dorothy Lamour providing decorative character of a native gal in sarong-like trappings. Crosby is the adventurous son of a shipping magnate, who refuses to sit behind a desk. He walks out on both father and a socialite fiancee to ship to the South Seas with sailor-buddy Hope. Lamour moves in with the pair, and from there on it’s a happy mixture of both making passes for the native beauty, while they struggle to raise the necessary coin to live in comfort on the island. Crosby eventually gets the girl, but not until the trio romps through some zany adventures.

Road to Singapore

Production

Paramount. Director Victor Schertzinger; Producer Harlan Thompson; Screenplay Don Hartman, Frank Butler; Camera William C. Mellor; Editor Paul Weatherwax; Music Victor Young (dir.); Art Director Hans Dreier, Robert Odell

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1940. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Bing Crosby Dorothy Lamour Bob Hope Charles Coburn Judith Barrett Anthony Quinn,
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