Q Planes is an aviation picture, but not heavy on heroics. Even in the final rescue sequence, melodramatically carried to the timber line of hokum, there is a refreshing tongue-in-cheek attitude. Whole thing is bright, breezy and flavorsome. Starts off as a newsreel, showing government buildings and streets in London.

Q Planes is an aviation picture, but not heavy on heroics. Even in the final rescue sequence, melodramatically carried to the timber line of hokum, there is a refreshing tongue-in-cheek attitude. Whole thing is bright, breezy and flavorsome. Starts off as a newsreel, showing government buildings and streets in London.

The acting honors go – and at a gallop – to Ralph Richardson, playing a Scotland Yard eccentric. Director Tim Whelan is entitled to full credit for a generally fast-paced and well-integrated entertainment.

Plot concerns the use of a salvage ship anchored at sea to capture army airplanes on their test flights. All of the crew speak with German accents and little doubt is left as to who the villains are.

Valerie Hobson, as a newspaper-woman and sister of the Scotland Yard eccentric, provides the romantic touch.

Q Planes

UK

Production

Harefield/London. Director Tim Whelan; Producer Irving Asher, Alexander Korda; Screenplay Ian Dalrymple, Brock Williams, Jack Whittingham, Arthur Wimperis; Camera Harry Stradling; Music Muir Mathieson (dir.); Art Director Vincent Korda

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1939. Running time: 82 MIN.

With

Laurence Olivier Ralph Richardson Valerie Hobson
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