Review: ‘Vivacious Lady’

Vivacious Lady is entertainment of the highest order and broadest appeal. Story by I.A.R. Wylie tells the romantic adventures and tribulations of a New York cabaret singer and a youthful college professor.

Vivacious Lady is entertainment of the highest order and broadest appeal. Story by I.A.R. Wylie tells the romantic adventures and tribulations of a New York cabaret singer and a youthful college professor.

It is a case of love at first sight, a speedy wooing and hasty marriage. Then the young man takes his bride to the small town and introduces her to his family and associates. Prejudice and stern respectability resist the invasion. Manner in which approval of the marriage is won from the boy’s parents is amusingly accomplished.

In their predicament of living apart until the conventional amenities of proper introduction into society are observed, Ginger Rogers and James Stewart undergo a series of connubial disappointments, interruptions ad interferences.

Beulah Bondi is the understanding mother-in-law and Charles Coburn is excellent as the father of the bridegroom.

1938: Nominations: Best Cinematography, Sound

Vivacious Lady

Production

RKO. Director George Stevens; Producer George Stevens; Screenplay P.J. Wolfson, Ernest Pagano; Camera Robert de Grasse; Editor Henry Berman; Music Roy Webb (dir.); Art Director Van Nest Polglase

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1938. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Ginger Rogers James Stewart James Ellison Beulah Bondi Charles Coburn Frances Mercer
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