Review: ‘The Drum’

Film is based on a story written specially for the screen by A.E.W. Mason. He supplies an excellent machine-made suspensive tale laid in India, with fine dialog.

Film is based on a story written specially for the screen by A.E.W. Mason. He supplies an excellent machine-made suspensive tale laid in India, with fine dialog.

Entire action is laid in the tribal territory of the northwest frontier of India. An elderly khan is anxious for British protection to ensure his throne for his son, Prince Axim (Sabu). Ruler’s brother, Prince Ghul, is fanatically anti-British, kills the old man, and the plot involves the attempt to do away with the young prince.

Sabu, the 14-year-old Indian youth who came to attention in Elephant Boy (1937), lives up to the promise given in that film and conducts himself with requisite dignity. He now speaks very good English. Raymond Massey is sufficiently sinister as the throne usurper; Roger Livesey is excellent as the military commander.

The Drum

UK

Production

London. Director Zoltan Korda; Producer Alexander Korda; Screenplay Lajos Biro, Arthur Wimperis, Patrick Kirwan, Hugh Gray; Camera Georges Perinal, Osmond Borradaile; Editor Henry Cornelius, William Hornbeck; Music John Greenwood, Miklos Rozsa; Art Director Vincent Korda, Ferdinand Bellan

Crew

(Color) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1938. Running time: 101 MIN.

With

Sabu Raymond Massey Roger Livesey Valerie Hobson David Tree Francis L. Sullivan

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