Review: ‘The Crowd Roars’

The manly art of self-defense, otherwise known as the cauliflower industry, alias prize-fighting, is a rough-and-tumble racket operated by big time gamblers with small time ethics, according to the film, The Crowd Roars in which Robert Taylor leads with his left hand. It's exciting melodrama with plenty of ring action, some plausible romance and several corking good characterizations.

The manly art of self-defense, otherwise known as the cauliflower industry, alias prize-fighting, is a rough-and-tumble racket operated by big time gamblers with small time ethics, according to the film, The Crowd Roars in which Robert Taylor leads with his left hand. It’s exciting melodrama with plenty of ring action, some plausible romance and several corking good characterizations.

There are moments early in the film when it appears that George Bruce, the author, intends to dwell on the angle of mob psychology. He steers away from any depth in the treatment of his theme, however, and holds to a plot about a choir boy who becomes a contender for the light heavyweight championship.

Frank Morgan creates something interesting out of the role of the pug’s father, a drunkard and braggart. Edward Arnold is the conventional bookmaker and fight manager, who works successfully on the theory that the smartest gamblers are the biggest suckers. Heart interest is centred in a love affair between Taylor and Maureen O’Sullivan.

The Crowd Roars

Production

M-G-M. Director Richard Thorpe; Producer Sam Zimbalist; Screenplay Thomas Lennon, George Bruce, George Oppenheimer; Camera John Seitz; Music Edward Ward

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1938. Running time: 87 MIN.

With

Robert Taylor Edward Arnold Frank Morgan Maureen O'Sullivan William Gargan Lionel Stander
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