Handicapped by an illogical and unconvincing story [by Katherine Brush], initial effort of Metro to team Judy Garland and Freddie Bartholomew is a lightweight offering that has little aside from three good song numbers handled capably by Garland.

Handicapped by an illogical and unconvincing story [by Katherine Brush], initial effort of Metro to team Judy Garland and Freddie Bartholomew is a lightweight offering that has little aside from three good song numbers handled capably by Garland.

Young Bartholomew is at the age where he is fast sprouting. He is several inches taller than in his previous film appearance [Lord Jeff, also 1938] while his voice has dropped down the scale considerably.

When Mary Astor considers marriage to insure security of her two children (Garland and Scotty Beckett), Bartholomew steps in to assist Garland to prevent such a move. Pair abduct the mother and young son in a trailer for a tour, figuring trip may change her mind, and there is always a chance of turning up a more likely candidate for a stepfather.

On the road, entourage meets Walter Pidgeon’s lawyer, who goes for the wide open spaces in a deluxe trailer. Kids bring Astor and Pidgeon together in a speedy two-day romance to put everything shipshape.

Listen, Darling

Production

M-G-M. Director Edwin L. Marin; Producer Jack Cummings; Screenplay Elaine Ryan, Anne Morrison Chapin; Camera Charles Lawton Jr; Editor Blanche Sewell; Music William Axt, George Stoll

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1938. Running time: 72 MIN.

With

Judy Garland Freddie Bartholomew Mary Astor Walter Pidgeon Alan Hale Scotty Beckett
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