As a true follower of the dizzy school of comedy, Four's a Crowd defies and renounces all relationship to reality. Providing much zest and spice to this dizzy dish [story by Wallace Sullivan] is Walter Connolly's characterization of the eccentric millionaire, whose major interest in life is his miniature electric railway system and a kennel of mastiffs that make tough going for unwanted visitors.

As a true follower of the dizzy school of comedy, Four’s a Crowd defies and renounces all relationship to reality. Providing much zest and spice to this dizzy dish [story by Wallace Sullivan] is Walter Connolly’s characterization of the eccentric millionaire, whose major interest in life is his miniature electric railway system and a kennel of mastiffs that make tough going for unwanted visitors.

While the film has its arid stretches, there is little letdown in action. Deftly developed is the miniature train race sequence, in which the millionaire’s entry meets defeat through the artful placement of a chunk of butter on the tracks.

Other laugh cascades derive from Errol Flynn’s attempt to carry on twin phone conversations with a couple of insistent dames, and from a double elopement in paralleling cabs with the situation stepped up in a big way by Hugh Herbert’s functioning as the cynical justice of the peace. The marriage service builds to a whirlwind finish.

Complications develop from Flynn’s efforts to sell the hardboiled Connolly into whitewashing his public-be-damned past by endowing a few clinical foundations. The wily public relations counsel uses his temporary connection as managing ed of Patric Knowles’ newspaper to stir up public sentiment against his proposed client.

Four's a Crowd

Production

Warner. Director Michael Curtiz; Screenplay Casey Robinson, Sid Herzig; Camera Ernest Haller; Editor Clarence Kolster; Music Heinz Roemheld, Ray Heindorf; Art Director Max Parker

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1938. Running time: 91 MIN.

With

Errol Flynn Olivia de Havilland Rosalind Russell Patric Knowles Walter Connolly Hugh Herbert
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