Review: ‘The King and the Chorus Girl’

Fernand Gravet, Mervyn LeRoy's Franco-Belgian import, makes an auspicious American debut in pictures. Film is a romantic comedy, silly but funny, inconsequential but swell for Gravet and Joan Blondell. This marks LeRoy's debut as a producer-director.

Fernand Gravet, Mervyn LeRoy’s Franco-Belgian import, makes an auspicious American debut in pictures. Film is a romantic comedy, silly but funny, inconsequential but swell for Gravet and Joan Blondell. This marks LeRoy’s debut as a producer-director.

Towards the end the story goes to pieces, and yet that, too, is in its favor. Becoming broad farce, yarn drops all pretense to reality and finishes with one of the best tags any film has ever had.

Gravet is wholly engaging as the bored ex-monarch, and Joan Blondell is capital as the American chorine in the Folies Bergere. Entire background is Paris. Strong support further enhances. Edward Everett Horton is at his droll best as the king’s buffer.

Gravet maintains the farcical proceedings throughout with rare good humor, while Blondell, as his American Cinderella vis-a-vis, supplies a basic boy (king)-meets-girl premise. Blondell has never looked better, and her performance here includes a restraint and softness previously lacking

The King and the Chorus Girl

Production

Warner. Director Mervyn LeRoy; Producer Mervyn LeRoy; Screenplay Norman Krasna, Groucho Marx; Camera Tony Gaudio; Editor Thomas Richards; Music Leo F. Forbstein (dir.)

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Fernand Gravet Joan Blondell Edward Everett Horton Alan Mowbray Jane Wyman Mary Nash
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