Review: ‘That Certain Woman’

Appeal is aimed strictly at the emotions, as the plot is another variation of self-sacrificing mother love. The film is a remake of The Trespasser, which Edmund Goulding earlier wrote and directed for Gloria Swanson in 1929.

Appeal is aimed strictly at the emotions, as the plot is another variation of self-sacrificing mother love. The film is a remake of The Trespasser, which Edmund Goulding earlier wrote and directed for Gloria Swanson in 1929.

Film relates the adventures of a self-reliant young woman (Bette Davis), who as a girl of 16 married a gangster, since deceased, after a bootleg altercation. She becomes the secretary of a prominent lawyer, an unhappily married man, who falls in love with her but keeps his distance. She falls in love with a wealthy young wastrel and marries him.

His father compels the young woman to reveal her past. The marriage is annulled, and the girl returns to her job. A son is born. Much later a scandal brings back the wastrel youth, now reformed, to help his one-time wife.

It’s a synthetic tale that does not stand up under too close analysis. The story deficiencies are not so important, however, because the characters are made credible by Davis and the cast, and by Goulding’s smooth direction. Ian Hunter as the girl’s employer, and Henry Fonda as the boy in the case are excellent.

That Certain Woman

Production

Warner. Director Edmund Goulding; Producer Robert Lord; Screenplay Edmund Goulding; Camera Ernest Haller; Editor Jack Killifer; Music Max Steiner; Art Director Max Parker

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 91 MIN.

With

Bette Davis Henry Fonda Ian Hunter Anita Louise Donald Crisp Hugh O'Donnell
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading