Review: ‘Oh, Mr. Porter!’

A railway comedy [story by Frank Launder], reminiscent of The Ghost Train (1931), written around the comic personality of Will Hay, supported by his very 'aged' and very 'young' foils.

A railway comedy [story by Frank Launder], reminiscent of The Ghost Train (1931), written around the comic personality of Will Hay, supported by his very ‘aged’ and very ‘young’ foils.

An amiable misfit, with a brother-in-law in the railway company, is sent as a last resort to a tiny, obscure village in Ireland as stationmaster, where his family hope to be rid of him. Finding a decrepit clerk and fat-boy porter the only occupants of the station, where no train ever stops, the newcomer tries to convert the ramshackle dump into something worthy of his dignity.

He senses a sinister atmosphere, in that his predecessors have either disappeared mysteriously, or gone nutty. Tracking a lost excursion to a disused tunnel and derelict line, the dauntless stationmaster discovers the supposedly ghostly crew are gun-runners about to get over the border.

No love interest to mar the comedy, as far as the juvenile mind is concerned, and the whole thing is amusing, if over-long.

Oh, Mr. Porter!

UK

Production

Gainsborough. Director Marcel Varnel; Producer Edward Black; Screenplay J.O.C. Orton, Val Guest, Marriott Edgar; Camera Arthur Crabtree; Editor R.E. Dearing, Alfred Roome; Music Louis Levy (dir.); Art Director Alex Vetchinsky

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Will Hay Moore Marriott Graham Moffatt Sebastian Smith Percy Walsh Agnes Lauchlan
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading