Review: ‘O.H.M.S.’

Not much to get excited about. Takes off from a fetching theme, but that nothing much eventuates can largely be blamed on a dour and flabby script

Not much to get excited about. Takes off from a fetching theme, but that nothing much eventuates can largely be blamed on a dour and flabby script

Wallace Ford is a lively enough personality in the central role. Narrative poses him as a petty American racketeer who flees to England from a threatened rap for murder. There he turns to the army as a hideout, enlisting as from Canada. With occasional touches of humor, picture relates his doings as a recruit, adding romance to the proceedings by making Ford the third corner in a play for the sergeant-major’s daughter (Anna Lee). His rival, and a good natured one, is his barracks sidekick (John Mills).

Complications develop when Ford’s former showgirl flame from the States pops up. Ford stows away on a ship and finds himself occupying the same vessel as his regiment bound for China. The girl is also aboard. Picture goes melodramatic for the final reel.

O.H.M.S.

UK

Production

Gaumont-British. Director Raoul Walsh; Producer [uncredited]; Screenplay Lesser Samuels, Ralph Bettinson, Austin Melford, Bryan Wallace; Camera Roy Kellino; Editor Charles Saunders; Music Louis Levy (dir.); Art Director Edward Metzner

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 87 MIN.

With

Wallace Ford John Mills Anna Lee Grace Bradley Frank Cellier Peter Croft
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