Review: ‘Madame X’

This is a reverent handling of the Alexandre Bisson play, chosen by M-G-M as a vehicle to demonstrate the dramatic and emotional talent of Gladys George. It's a quiet, comforting sniffle.

This is a reverent handling of the Alexandre Bisson play, chosen by M-G-M as a vehicle to demonstrate the dramatic and emotional talent of Gladys George. It’s a quiet, comforting sniffle.

Script follows with devotion the familiar developments, and the dialog is as modern as the action permits. Sam Wood’s direction is conventionally sound and the production is of the best.

George’s performance is effective, and her characterization of the tipsy, defeated and maudlin old woman is faithful and moving. Warren William plays the hard-hearted husband who refuses to forgive his wife’s indiscretions; Reginald Owen is the friend, Douvel; Henry Daniell is the villain, Lerocle.

John Beal has the prize spot of Raymond, youthful public defender of his mother, whose identity is unknown to him. His address to the court is recited with conviction and emotion.

Madame X

Production

M-G-M. Director Sam Wood; Producer James Kevin McGuinness; Screenplay John Meehan; Camera John Seitz; Editor Frank E. Hull; Music David Snell; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, Urie McCleary, Edwin B. Willis

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 75 MIN.

With

Gladys George John Beal Warren William Reginald Owen William Henry Henry Daniell
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