Review: ‘Double Wedding’

Those two box-office dynamiters, William Powell and Myrna Loy, are yoked in Double Wed ding, an outright slapstick comedy which would be funnier if it were shorter.

Those two box-office dynamiters, William Powell and Myrna Loy, are yoked in Double Wed ding, an outright slapstick comedy which would be funnier if it were shorter.

Powell is a trailer dweller in an auto parking spot in a big city, an artist vagrant with an amusing if somewhat cockeyed philosophy of life which can be summed up by stating that work is for workmen of which he is not one, just as the ocean is for sailors. Jo Swerling wrote the screenplay from a comedy [Great Love] by Ferenc Molnar.

Loy is the proprietor of a smart style shop and so engrossed in the problems of moneymaking and the responsibilities of rearing a younger sister that she has no time for play. Sister is screen-struck, dreaming of a Hollywood career. Loy has chosen otherwise and selects a nice boy for her sister to marry. Then the young couple meet Powell in his trailer and Myrna’s plans get a rude shuffling. Sister falls for Powell.

Double Wedding

Production

M-G-M. Director Richard Thorpe; Producer Joseph L. Mankiewicz; Screenplay Jo Swerling; Camera William Daniels; Editor Frank Sullivan; Music Edward Ward

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 87 MIN.

With

William Powell Myrna Loy Florence Rice John Beal Jessie Ralph Edgar Kennedy
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