Angel is a rich Hollywood dish that copies foreign recipes. It is Ernest Lubitsch, with Continental delight, tackling a plot to his liking [from a play by Melchior Lengyel] in a far more serious manner than is his custom.

Angel is a rich Hollywood dish that copies foreign recipes. It is Ernest Lubitsch, with Continental delight, tackling a plot to his liking [from a play by Melchior Lengyel] in a far more serious manner than is his custom.

Angel is a drama more than it is comedy, laugh lines being restricted almost to servants, who include Edward Everett Horton, Ernest Cossart and Herbert Mundin. Cossart gets the biggest chance to make good. He is a particularly engaging butler in the swank household of a British diplomat.

Lubitsch has used a comparatively small cast, keeping the action almost entirely to three people, Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall and Melvyn Douglas.

The story seriously portrays a girl of the old world who loves her husband and home, yet must graze around in strange pastures. Authors seek to accentuate that a woman can love two men at the same time. It also sets out to prove that a husband is willing to recognize this on evidence and take chances on the consequences.

Dietrich is glamour in double dress. This time she is wearing eyelashes you could hang your hat on and every now and then the star flicks ’em as though a dust storm was getting in her way. Marshall is excellent as the duped husband. The usual, smooth performance is obtained from Douglas as the persistent lover.

Angel

Production

Paramount. Director Ernst Lubitsch; Producer Ernst Lubitsch; Writer Samson Raphaelson, Guy Bolton, Russell Medcraft; Camera Charles Lang Editor William Shea; Music Boris Morros (dir.) Art Hans Dreier, Robert Usher

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1937. Running time: 98 MIN.

With

Marlene Dietrich Herbert Marshall Melvyn Douglas Edward Everett Horton Herbert Mundin Ernest Cossart
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