Here Jean Harlow is no siren. She is a perfectly competent secretary, very much in love with her job and her boss, but she does not go on the make for him. Myrna Loy, as the wife, is much in love with Clark Gable, and he with her. They are an ideal couple until his mother plants the seeds of suspicion, which are watered and fertilized by other women friends.

Here Jean Harlow is no siren. She is a perfectly competent secretary, very much in love with her job and her boss, but she does not go on the make for him. Myrna Loy, as the wife, is much in love with Clark Gable, and he with her. They are an ideal couple until his mother plants the seeds of suspicion, which are watered and fertilized by other women friends.

The blow-off comes when Gable refuses to take his wife to Havana on a business trip, but has his secretary fly down with some important data on the deal he has gone to close. Loy calls up and Harlow answers the phone. Loy decides to go to Europe and forget it all.

The script has been excellently handled, with the dialog held to a naturalness seldom achieved on the screen.

Gable gets a part which might have been tailored to his order and differentiates skillfully between his impulsive love for his wife and his friendly appreciation of his stenographer’s merits. Loy gets a part which suits her, but it is Harlow who profits most. She clicks in every scene without going spectacular as to costume.

Wife vs. Secretary

Production

M-G-M. Director Clarence Brown; Producer Hunt Stromberg; Screenplay Norman Krasna, Alice Duer Miller, John Lee Mahin; Camera Ray June; Editor Frank E. Hull; Music Herbert Stothart, Edward Ward; Art Director Cedric Gibbons, William A. Horning

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1936. Running time: 88 MIN.

With

Clark Gable Jean Harlow Myrna Loy May Robson Hobart Cavanaugh James Stewart
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