Many and varied gags, majority of which land, combine with a set of good songs and individual performances to make this good entertainment. Picture doesn't look the cost of previous Cantor starrers. It is a little less lavish.

Many and varied gags, majority of which land, combine with a set of good songs and individual performances to make this good entertainment. Picture doesn’t look the cost of previous Cantor starrers. It is a little less lavish.

Cantor is aces all the way. In some instances he’s actually cute, but he isn’t singing so much in Strike Me Pink, having only two numbers, one with Merman atop a ferris wheel, the other (a production display) with Rita Rio, hotcha tapster and okay, and the girls. There are only four songs [by Harold Arlen and Lew Brown] and no reprises.

Other two numbers are for Ethel Merman alone in the nitery setting, where she’s spotted as the particular weakness of the hick Cantor. Merman is tops.

Dances and ensembles were photographed by Gregg Toland, while Merman’s first number, unusually well done, was cameraed by Merritt Gerstad and specially credited.

Story is the kind of comedy yarn which could have been done without the benefit of singing and dancing. Originally called Dreamland, it was intended for Harold Lloyd and would have made ideal material for this comedian. Going to Sam Goldwyn instead for the use of Cantor, rights to title Strike Me Pink, name of a musical comedy done several years earlier, were acquired.

Big-eyed comic plays a meek tailor to college campus trade whose efforts to overcome an inferiority complex land him quite by accident into the job of general manager for an amusement park that is trying to keep slot machines off the premises. Cantor’s troubles with the racketeers behind the slot machines form the basis for most of the comedy situations.

Strike Me Pink

Production

Goldwyn/United Artists. Director Norman Taurog; Producer Samuel Goldwyn; Screenplay Frank Butler, Walter De Leon, Francis Martin, Philip Rapp; Camera Gregg Toland, Merritt Gerstad, Ray Binger; Editor Sherman Todd; Music Alfred Newman (dir.)

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1936. Running time: 99 MIN.

With

Eddie Cantor Ethel Merman Sally Eilers William Frawley Brian Donlevy
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0