Even though it makes an attempt to poke fun at the show-must-go-on thing, Stage Struck is cut from the same old pattern, gravitating between moments of sizzling comedy and long stretches of dull palaver.

Even though it makes an attempt to poke fun at the show-must-go-on thing, Stage Struck is cut from the same old pattern, gravitating between moments of sizzling comedy and long stretches of dull palaver.

Picture takes a pretzel-like course in recounting the conventional yarn [by Robert Lord] about the unknown kid who makes good as the last-minute fill-in for the show’s star. Musical interludes [songs by E.Y. Harburg and Harold Arlen] are kept down to the minimum.

With her material anything but surefire, Joan Blondell unlimbers a likable grade of comedy. Hers is the part of the dame whose only claim to fame is a penchant for drilling her troublesome boy friends and the newsprint attention that goes with such incidents. She backs herself to the lead part in a musical show where Dick Powell functions as director. A clash of temperaments ends that venture and the pair meet again in her next bit of angeling.

Paired with Powell for the romantic byplay, Jeanne Madden does okay for a starter.

Stagestruck

Production

Warner. Director Busby Berkeley; Screenplay Tom Buckingham, Pat C. Flick; Camera Byron Haskin

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1936. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Dick Powell Joan Blondell Warren William Frank McHugh Jeanne Madden Carol Hughes
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