Review: ‘Louis Pasteur’

Most audiences won't understand a great deal of the scientific background or import, and a great portion won't care. Try as hard as the producers could, they haven't avoided some dull stretches of scientific discourse certain to baffle average audiences. Expert casting and splendid production are the points in the film's favor, primarily. Paul Muni in the title role is at his very top form.

Most audiences won’t understand a great deal of the scientific background or import, and a great portion won’t care. Try as hard as the producers could, they haven’t avoided some dull stretches of scientific discourse certain to baffle average audiences. Expert casting and splendid production are the points in the film’s favor, primarily. Paul Muni in the title role is at his very top form.

Film starts out with Louis Pasteur (Muni) already somewhat established, skipping his early life and struggles. His wine and beer discoveries have already been accepted and he’s propagandizing for sterilization of doctors and doctors’ instruments in childbirth. Doesn’t get him very far because of general medical opposition, and he turns to treatment of anthrax in sheep and cattle.

Gets that over and is admitted in to the French Academy, although still scoffed at by the majority of his confreres. Works on a cure for rabies and hydrophobia for the rest of the picture. His reward finally is general acclaim.

Josephine Hutchinson as Pasteur’s wife is splendid and believable. Anita Louise as his daughter and Donald Woods as her finacee are expected to handle the romance and almost do it. Fritz Leiber as Dr. Charbonnet, Pasteur’s strongest enemy, turns in an outstanding performance.

Louis Pasteur

Production

Warner. Director William Dieterle; Screenplay Sheridan Gibney, Pierre Collings; Camera Tony Gaudio

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1936. Running time: 85 MIN.

With

Paul Muni Josephine Hutchinson Anita Louise Donald Woods Fritz Leiber Henry O'Neill
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading