British-made picture has Jessie Matthews at her best. Matthews is the star, but the story [by Marion Dix] is based on rival columnists who invent people to make exclusive news.

British-made picture has Jessie Matthews at her best. Matthews is the star, but the story [by Marion Dix] is based on rival columnists who invent people to make exclusive news.

Peter Carlton (Robert Young) invents a ‘Mrs Smythe-Smythe’, supposedly a tiger hunter from India, pursued by a maharajah. Matthews assumes the role of the non-existent ‘Mrs Smythe-Smythe’ to strut her stuff and possibly get an opening on the stage. She does, but gives up the impersonation when Carlton’s rival senses her disguise and threat- ens to expose her unless she gives him the inside track on scoops.

Matthews does a variety of dances [arranged by Buddy Bradley], one a mock Indian number in a striking, if scanty, costume. There is a big production number, less impressive, perhaps, than Hollywood numbers, but as well devised and given an unusual staging. Here the costume is full tights with sequins. There is another pretty dance bit in a park and a near society dance in a restaurant set.

Matthews carries her part well and sings several songs [by Sam Coslow and Harry Woods], a couple of which are not in perfect synchrony. Young is a personable columnist and Sonnie Hale, as his idea man, is handicapped by a drunk assignment.

It's Love Again

UK

Production

Gaumont-British. Director Victor Saville; Producer [uncredited]; Screenplay Marion Dix, Lesser Samuels, Austin Melford; Camera Glen MacWilliams; Editor Al Barnes; Music Louis Levy, Bretton Byrd; Art Director Alfred Junge

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS. Extract of a review from 1936. Running time: 83 MIN.

With

Jessie Matthews Robert Young Sonnie Hale Ernest Milton Robb Wilton Sara Allgood
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