A sockeroo woman's picture. Has Fredric March, Merle Oberon and Herbert Marshall and a forthright sentimental romance, well directed by Sidney Franklin to sustain almost every element [of the play by Guy Bolton, a.k.a. R.B. Trevelyan, adapted by Claudine West].

A sockeroo woman’s picture. Has Fredric March, Merle Oberon and Herbert Marshall and a forthright sentimental romance, well directed by Sidney Franklin to sustain almost every element [of the play by Guy Bolton, a.k.a. R.B. Trevelyan, adapted by Claudine West].

Grown up together from childhood, the war throws Kitty Vane (Oberon) to March as her natural romantic choice. Marshall and Oberon later berate themselves in mistaken belief they have sent March to his doom. Instead, after nursing in a German prison camp and later back in his native England, March turns up under a nom-de-plume, an author of best sellers for juveniles, but permanently blind and in constant mental dread of becoming a burden to his bride without benefit of clergy.

Oberon is a revelation as a reformed vamp. In simple hairdo and sans any great sartorial display, her emotional opportunities are fully met upon every occasion. Marshall and March are superb as the war-torn, love-torn boyhood chums, mutually in love with Oberon. Both refuse to avail themselves of any opportunities to stretch the emotional tension.

1935: Best Interior Decoration (Richard Day).

Nomination: Best Actress (Merle Oberon)

The Dark Angel

Production

Goldwyn. Director Sidney Franklin; Producer Samuel Goldwyn; Screenplay Lillian Hellman, Mordaunt Shairp; Camera Gregg Toland; Editor Sherman Todd; Music Alfred Newman (dir.); Art Director Richard Day

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 105 MIN.

With

Fredric March Merle Oberon Herbert Marshall Janet Beecher John Halliday Henrietta Crosman
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