Review: ‘Splendor’

Here is a rare combination of a well-written story, interpreted in skilled and sympathetic action under able and understanding direction. This is the film Rachel Crothers specially authored for Goldwyn on a royalty and guarantee basis.

Here is a rare combination of a well-written story, interpreted in skilled and sympathetic action under able and understanding direction. This is the film Rachel Crothers specially authored for Goldwyn on a royalty and guarantee basis.

Miriam Hopkins marries Joel McCrea while he is south on a business trip, and he proudly bring her home, not realizing that his ambitious mother (Helen Westley) is looking to a marriage with an heiress (Ruth Weston).

Hopkins gets small welcome from her in-laws, and even McCrea is a bit impatient with her because of his own perplexities. His father and grandfather amassed money, apparently without effort. He doesn’t seem able to realize why he cannot.

Paul Cavanaugh, a distant relative, takes an interest in the young wife and things become easier for her. The old lady looks to her to use her influence in behalf of McCrea. She virtually forces the girl into an affair.

Helen Westley, as the mother, is the dominant figure. Her cold-blooded, merciless nagging of the girl is as well played as it has been written. Hopkins is not altogether at ease as the sweet young thing in the first few scenes, but later she doesn’t miss a chance. Paul Cavanaugh is admirable.

Splendor

Production

Goldwyn/United Artists. Director Elliott Nugent; Producer Samuel Goldwyn; Screenplay Rachel Crothers; Camera Gregg Toland; Editor Margaret Clancey; Music Alfred Newman; Art Director Richard Day

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 77 MIN.

With

Miriam Hopkins Joel McCrea Paul Cavanaugh Helen Westley Billie Burke David Niven

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