Review: ‘Song of Ceylon’

This thoroughgoing four-reel travelog on Ceylon attemps to dig down deep and cinematically explain the country and its people in more thorough manner than customarily encountered. Unfortunately it is just a shade too arty.

This thoroughgoing four-reel travelog on Ceylon attemps to dig down deep and cinematically explain the country and its people in more thorough manner than customarily encountered. Unfortunately it is just a shade too arty.

Had some of the hard-headed realistic March of Time approach been used, film would have come off much better. As it stands, the fancy and at time fantastic treatment will largely mystify audiences. In view of the splendid camerawork and some of the sequences, notably the native dances and religious devotions to Buddha, pic should have been aimed at the general public.

Effort to explain the economics and commerce of Ceylon is badly muddled through extensive use of vague or bewildering symbolisms. [Film is narrated by Lionel Wendt.]

Song of Ceylon

UK

Production

Ceylon Tea Production Board. Director Basil Wright; Producer John Grierson; Camera Basil Wright; Music Walter Leigh

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 39 MIN.
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