Paramount obviously couldn't make up its mind what it wanted to do with this film; it's rambling and hokey. For a few moments it's sheer farce, for a few moments it's romance. And it never jells.

Paramount obviously couldn’t make up its mind what it wanted to do with this film; it’s rambling and hokey. For a few moments it’s sheer farce, for a few moments it’s romance. And it never jells.

Story [by Booth Tarkington] comes off the shelf. It was produced at least twice previously; first silent entitled The Fighting Coward (1924) and next as a talker for Buddy Rogers under its stage title, Magnolia. This time it has been completely written over, but gagged up too much. Some of the lines are funny, but that isn’t enough. W.C. Fields works hard throughout the film and saves it, giving it whatever entertainment value it has.

The Bing Crosby part was written with Lanny Ross in mind and even when he’s singing it’s no go.

Three songs in the film and all good, although leaving something to be desired. That, too, is a production fault and not traceable to Rodgers & Hart. All three numbers are slow, dreamy tunes for Crosby to sing.

Joan Bennett is the girl, but doesn’t get a chance to do much outside of looking pretty. Gail Patrick smiles nicely in the first reel only.

Mississippi

Production

Paramount. Director A. Edward Sutherland; Producer Arthur Hornblow Jr; Screenplay Francis Martin, Herbert Fields, Claude Binvon, Jack Cunningham; Camera Charles Lang; Editor Chandler House; Art Director Hans Dreier, Bernard Herzbrun

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Bing Crosby W.C. Fields Joan Bennett Queenie Smith Gail Patrick Paul Hurst
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