Go into Your Dance has much to recommend it as a lavishly produced, vigorously directed and agreeably entertaining musical picture [based on a story by Bradford Ropes]. Besides everything else it has Al Jolson in top form, plus a nifty set of songs [by Al Dubin and Harry Warren].

Go into Your Dance has much to recommend it as a lavishly produced, vigorously directed and agreeably entertaining musical picture [based on a story by Bradford Ropes]. Besides everything else it has Al Jolson in top form, plus a nifty set of songs [by Al Dubin and Harry Warren].

Along with Jolson and for the first time his screen partner is the missus, Ruby Keeler. A sensible story setting, in which each is permitted to adhere to type, makes them a nice film couple.

Jolson plays the role of a talented star who has broken up many a hit show by going off on bats. The star is finally barred from the musical stage by the combined votes of Actors Equity and an association of producers.

With the help of his devoted sister and a dancing girl with whom he teams up, the banished star starts his comeback via the nightclub field. The comeback is nearly interrupted by gangster bullets, but they miss the star and hit his girl partner.

Keeler is given plenty of footage for her dancing; perhaps more than any dancer, including Astaire, has been accorded in any one picture thus far. On the hoof she’s a girl who can take good care of herself, and in the histrionic moments she’s carried along by Jolson’s aggressive trouping.

1935: Nomination: Best Dance Direction (‘Lady from Manhattan’)

Go Into Your Dance

Production

First National/Warner. Director Archie Mayo; Screenplay Earl Baldwin; Camera Tony Gaudio; Editor Harold McLernon; Music Ray Heindorf (arr.); Art Director John Hughes

Crew

(B&W) Available on DVD. Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 92 MIN.

With

Al Jolson Ruby Keeler Glenda Farrell Barton MacLane Patsy Kelly Akim Tamaroff
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