Review: ‘Dangerous’

Laird Doyle knows his romantic dialog. Better than he knows his plot, but with the former carrying the latter, he has banged out an appealing scenario for the women in Dangerous.

Laird Doyle knows his romantic dialog. Better than he knows his plot, but with the former carrying the latter, he has banged out an appealing scenario for the women in Dangerous.

The triangle involves a successful young architect, a society girl and an actress. Bette Davis loses the man to the other girl, but she has the closing sequence all to herself, and while the sympathy is distributed equally among all three characters, it’s unquestionably Davis’ picture at the conclusion.

The actress has been famous but has hit the skids and is soused when the architect first meets her in a cellar joint. There is a series of complications, including the reappearance of an almost forgotten husband and an automobile crash. Society girl hovers in the background after the architect breaks off their engagement upon falling for the actress. The production of a show on his money is also worked in.

Laird’s dialog is adult, intelligent and has a rhythmic beat. Davis’ performance is fine on the whole, despite a few imperfect moments. When called upon to reach an intense dramatic pitch without hysterics, Davis is capable of turning the trick. Yet there are moments in Dangerous when a lighter acting mood would be opportune.

Franchot Tone is splendid as the architect. Margaret Lindsay has a sit-‘n’-wait assignment that didn’t call for exertion.

Dangerous

Production

Warner. Director Alfred E. Green; Producer Harry Joe Brown; Screenplay Laird Doyle; Camera Ernie Haller; Editor Thomas Richards; Art Director Hugh Reticker

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1935. Running time: 78 MIN.

With

Bette Davis Franchot Tone Margaret Lindsay Alison Skipworth John Eldredge Dick Foran
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