Kay Francis is a girl of doubtful past, present and future who eventually casts her lot with an outcast doctor in what an extra reel may have developed as possible reformation for both.

Kay Francis is a girl of doubtful past, present and future who eventually casts her lot with an outcast doctor in what an extra reel may have developed as possible reformation for both.

Picture trips along at a nice pace and except for one spot, toward the end, invites no adverse reaction. This is in connection with the faked suicide of Ricardo Cortez, a gun-runner who leaves an empty poison bottle and an open window in his ship’s cabin as evidence of his act.

The audience is let in on the phony suicide, whereas it would have been more effective to spring the surprise and the explanation on the audience the same as on people in the cast, notably Francis.

Much of the action [from a story by Paul Hervey Fox] occurs on a boat bound from Rangoon for Mandalay. Earlier sequences are in the former seaport, where the heroine has been forced into a life of doubtful purity when her gun-runner boyfriend takes a run-out powder. This portion of the story isn’t as convincing as it might be. Manner in which Warner Oland browbeats her into working for his joint is anything but convincing, either.

Mandalay

Production

Warner. Director Michael Curtiz; Producer Robert Presnell; Screenplay Austin Parker, Charles Kenyon; Camera Tony Gaudio; Editor Thomas Pratt; Art Director Anton Grot

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1934. Running time: 65 MIN.

With

Kay Francis Lyle Talbot Ricardo Cortez Warner Oland Lucien Littlefield Ruth Donnelly
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