This lavish musical from the British studios is a colorful, extravagant costume film that makes its bid for attention purely on an extravaganza platform, and makes the grade. It is, compared to American musicals, slow. But this very slowness happens to fit this type of yarn.

This lavish musical from the British studios is a colorful, extravagant costume film that makes its bid for attention purely on an extravaganza platform, and makes the grade. It is, compared to American musicals, slow. But this very slowness happens to fit this type of yarn.

Story of Chu-Chin-Chow is the story of Ali Baba from the Arabian tales. George Robey is Ali Baba, the sap who became a millionaire; Anna May Wong is Zahrat, the unfaithful and vengeful slave girl; Fritz Kortner is Abu Hasan, the robber chief. All are excellent choices.

John Garrick is a handsome Nur-al-din, carrying the love interest with Marjanah (Pearl Argyle). Argyle is decorative and Garrick has a splendid singing voice.

Chief honors go to the director, Walter Forde, although there aren’t any slipups in casting or other items. Anton Dolin, one of Britain’s best name dancers among the modernists, stages the dances very effectively, and Frederic Norton’s music from the original show [written by Oscar Asche] is never tiresome.

Chu-Chin-Chow

UK

Production

Gainsborough/Gaumont-British. Director Walter Forde; Producer Michael Balcon, Phil Samuel; Screenplay Edward Knoblock, Sidney Gilliat, L. du Garde Peach; Camera Mutz Greenbaum; Editor Derek Twist; Music Louis Levy (dir.);; Art Director Erno Metzner

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1934. Running time: 102 MIN.

With

George Robey Anna May Wong Fritz Kortner John Garrick Pearl Argyle Francis Sullivan
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