Review: ‘When Ladies Meet’

Few stage plays reach the screen with the author's idea. But here the adapters have preserved the savor of the original [by Rachel Crothers] while producing a generally mobile atmosphere.

Few stage plays reach the screen with the author’s idea. But here the adapters have preserved the savor of the original [by Rachel Crothers] while producing a generally mobile atmosphere.

Story gets off to a typical picture start, which will lead those unfamiliar with the drama to fear another of those wild-life-in-society yarns, but it soon steadies down into nicely-paced action punctuated by plenty of laughs that arise from the lines instead of horseplay.

When the big scene between the two women (Ann Harding and Myrna Loy) does arrive, the spectator is so intrigued by the characters that it is not necessary to frantically angle to conceal the fact that the chat runs what might be overlong. It’s interesting and holds quiet attention, which is unusual.

The script is nicely planned with much of the original dialog apparently preserved, and Harry Beaumont does an exceptional job of direction.

In addition to Harding’s fine playing, Loy does an excellent chore with the nominal heroine as the ambitious young writer who has fallen in love with her publisher. She plays sincerely and naturally. Robert Montgomery does not quite get into his character. On the other hand Alice Brady, in a fat part as a socialite is dangerously close to running away with the film now and then, and is responsible for the major portion of laughs.

1932/33: Nomination: Best Art Direction

When Ladies Meet

Production

M-G-M. Director Harry Beaumont; Producer Lawrence Weingarten; Screenplay John Meehan, Leon Gordon; Camera Ray June; Editor Hugh Wynn

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 73 MIN.

With

Ann Harding Robert Montgomery Myrna Loy Alice Brady Frank Morgan Luis Alberni
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading