Review: ‘The Mummy’

The Mummy [from a story by Nina Wilcox Putnam and Richard Schayer] has some weird sequences and it is the first starring film for Boris Karloff.

The Mummy [from a story by Nina Wilcox Putnam and Richard Schayer] has some weird sequences and it is the first starring film for Boris Karloff.

Revival of the mummy comes comparatively early in the running time. The transformation of Karloff’s Im-Ho-Tep from a clay-like figure in a coffin to a living thing is the highlight.

The sequence in the museum with Im-Ho planning to kill Helen Grosvenor, of Egyptian heritage, to revive her ancient state, is too stagey. The mustiness of the tombs excavated is also over-suggestive of the Hollywood set.

Other members of the cast are made to figure as the puppets of Im-Ho and to carry over the dialog during the few times Karloff takes intermissions from the camera. Zita Johann is attractive, but always role-conscious, as Grosvenor.

The Mummy

Production

Universal. Director Karl Freund; Producer Stanley Bergerman; Screenplay John L. Balderston; Camera Charles Stumar; Art Director Willy Pogany

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 63 MIN.

With

Boris Karloff Zita Johann David Manners Edward Van Sloan Arthur Byron Bramwell Fletcher
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