Review: ‘The Invisible Man’

The strangest character yet created by the screen [from the novel by H.G. Wells] roams through The Invisible Man. Sometimes he is seen, dressed and bandaged up into a fantastic, eerie-looking figure, at other times he is moving through the action unseen.

The strangest character yet created by the screen [from the novel by H.G. Wells] roams through The Invisible Man. Sometimes he is seen, dressed and bandaged up into a fantastic, eerie-looking figure, at other times he is moving through the action unseen.

As the invisible madman (Claude Rains) is moving around, the negative reflects the things he does, such as rocking in a chair, smoking a cigarette, carrying something, opening doors, or socking someone in the jaw with the impact felt rather than seen.

First reel evokes considerable comedy in sequences at a small country inn where the invisible one secures lodging and indulges in his first murder. The innkeeper and his wife (Forrester Harvey and Una O’Connor, respectively) are swell comedy types and make the most of the opportunity. O’Connor relies a lot on a very shrill scream.

At the outset it is learned that a young chemist has discovered a terrible formula, including a very dangerous drug, that makes human flesh invisible. His interest had been strictly scientific but the drug had the effect, after use, of turning him into a maniac. At about the time he starts the murders he is looking for the antidote to bring him back to a normal condition.

The Invisible Man

Production

Universal. Director James Whale; Producer Carl Laemmle Jr; Screenplay R. C. Sherriff; Camera Arthur Edeson; Editor Ted Kent; Music [uncredited]; Art Director Charles D. Hall

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 70 MIN.

With

Claude Rains Gloria Stuart Henry Travers William Harrigan Una O'Connor Holmes Herbert
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading