Strictly a formula story of the Royal Flying Corps by the man who wrote Wings [John Monk Saunders] with a laboriously dragged in romantic bit. Nothing much new in the matter of plot, the same old yarn of the man who gets fed up of the uselessness of war.

Strictly a formula story of the Royal Flying Corps by the man who wrote Wings [John Monk Saunders] with a laboriously dragged in romantic bit. Nothing much new in the matter of plot, the same old yarn of the man who gets fed up of the uselessness of war.

Basic idea is the hero who is broken by the strain. He has lost observer after observer without serious injury to himself, and it breaks his morale. His last observer is a rather tough-fibered chap and there is bad blood between them. Fredric March is sent back home to regain his poise, there is a brief two-scene interlude with Carole Lombard, and he comes back to the lines still shaken.

Yarn is adroitly told in both dialog and action, Jack Oakie contributing some sorely-needed comedy touches here and there. It is the only relief save for a delightfully played bit between Oakie and Adrienne D’Ambicourt, who makes the most of her single scene. Carole Lombard contributes little in spite of sincere playing. March offers a finely sensitive study, acting with force, but entirely without bombast. Cary Grant is more along the usual lines, but he supplies the complementary action effectively, and Guy Standing as the commander gets a brief chance now and then.

The Eagle and the Hawk

Production

Paramount. Director Stuart Walker, Mitchell Leisen; Producer Bayard Veiller; Screenplay Bogart Rogers, Seton I. Miller; Camera Harry Fischbeck

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 74 MIN.

With

Fredric March Cary Grant Jack Oakie Carole Lombard Guy Standing Forrester Harvey
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