Review: ‘Sitting Pretty’

Sitting Pretty's assets are a youthful trio of leads, some fast dialog, a swell score and direction that hits a pace from the start and sustains it to the finish.

Sitting Pretty’s assets are a youthful trio of leads, some fast dialog, a swell score and direction that hits a pace from the start and sustains it to the finish.

The good old triangle provides a foundation for the action [from a story suggested by Nina Wilcox Putnam]. But that foundation is neatly upholstered by the cast, the music, the girls and the staging. Story takkes Jack Oakie and Jack Haley to Hollywood as a songwriting team. Back in New York they’re told to go west by Mack Gordon, who plays a music publisher in the film and who, with his partner Harry Revel, wrote the score. Ginger Rogers slips in as a kindhearted lunch-wagon proprietress whom the boys happen to touch while hitch-hiking westward.

For Oakie it’s quite familiar ground; again he’s the fresh guy who goes swell-headed from success, then becomes a nice but deflated fellow at the finish. For Haley this is his first really important screen assignment. Rogers hasn’t an opportunity to get a good lick at the ball, being hemmed in by story limitations, but she looks good.

Gregory Ratoff plays a Hollywood agent, and through this dialectician and Lew Cody, as a picture producer, the dialog gets in some satirical inside studio stuff that’s broad enough to be understood by almost anybody.

Sitting Pretty

Production

Paramount. Director Harry Joe Brown; Producer Charles R. Rogers; Screenplay Jack McGowan, S. J. Perelman, Lou Breslow; Camera Milton Krasner; Art Director Lyle Wheeler, Leland Fuller

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Jack Oakie Jack Haley Ginger Rogers Thelma Todd Gregory Ratoff Lew Cody
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