It's a sugar-coated gang story, but worked out indirectly, the underworld plot developing as secondary to a romantic tale, two rather surefire elements teamed in a rather shrewd treatment. Development has capital comedy incident and some of the most likable characters of underworld pictures.

It’s a sugar-coated gang story, but worked out indirectly, the underworld plot developing as secondary to a romantic tale, two rather surefire elements teamed in a rather shrewd treatment. Development has capital comedy incident and some of the most likable characters of underworld pictures.

Action revolves around three characters: a rich lawyer with a taste for criminal cases; the gangster he saves from the chair; and the girl who appears to help him clear a society friend, framed in a killing by a rival gang chief. Finish is elaborately prepared.

The adaptation [from the novel by Arthur Somers Roche] has been well done. Interest is splendidly centered and never gets out of focus as it frequently does in arranging scattered book material into screen form.

Warner Baxter turns in one of his usual workmanlike performances, while Myrna Loy reveals new skill in the management of light scenes – light on the surface but with the inference of tenseness in the background.

Penthouse

Production

M-G-M. Director W.S. Van Dyke; Producer Hunt Stromberg; Screenplay Frances Goodrich, Albert Hackett; Camera Lucien Andriot, Harold Rosson

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1933. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Warner Baxter Myrna Loy Charles Butterworth Mae Clarke Phillips Holmes C. Henry Gordon
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