Review: ‘What Price Hollywood?’

It's a fan magazine-ish interpretation of Hollywood plus a couple of twists. A waitress becomes a picture star, marries a wealthy playboy, loses him and gets him back when her screen career founders on the suicide of the director who gave her a start.

It’s a fan magazine-ish interpretation of Hollywood plus a couple of twists. A waitress becomes a picture star, marries a wealthy playboy, loses him and gets him back when her screen career founders on the suicide of the director who gave her a start.

Director George Cukor tells it interestingly. Story [by Adela Rogers St John] has its exaggerations, but they can sneak under the line as theatrical license. In any case, there’s Constance Bennett floating around smartly costumed for street or boudoir; Neil Hamilton is more pleasant than usual as the juvenile; Gregory Ratoff is closer to some film producers in his portrayal than the average audience will realize; and Lowell Sherman is again to the front with a fine interpretation of a derelict director.

1931/32: Nomination: Best Original Story

What Price Hollywood?

Production

RKO. Director George Cukor; Producer Pandro S. Berman (assoc.); Screenplay Gene Fowler, Rowland Brown, Jane Murfin, Ben Markson; Camera Charles Rosher; Editor [Jack Kitchen]; Music Max Steiner (dir.); Art Director Carroll Clark

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1932. Running time: 87 MIN.

With

Constance Bennett Lowell Sherman Neil Hamilton Gregory Ratoff Brooks Benedict
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