Nonsensical slapstick story derived somehow from Frederick Lonsdale's Her Cardboard Lover. There is some comedy of merit in this flimsy scenario, stretched from a natural two-reel length to fill a full-length spool, and it isn't necessary to gaze beyond the cast to find the source. But the cast and the laughs are constantly obliged to fight the plot and motives; unfortunately the plot wins the battle, contrary to the picture's best interests.

Nonsensical slapstick story derived somehow from Frederick Lonsdale’s Her Cardboard Lover. There is some comedy of merit in this flimsy scenario, stretched from a natural two-reel length to fill a full-length spool, and it isn’t necessary to gaze beyond the cast to find the source. But the cast and the laughs are constantly obliged to fight the plot and motives; unfortunately the plot wins the battle, contrary to the picture’s best interests.

Not until the plate-tossing finish does the story catch up with the playing in effectiveness. Up to then Jimmy Durante and Buster Keaton are compelled to carry the burden alone.

While Durante and Keaton are cross-firing for laughs the rest is momentarily laid aside, and when the chief laugh grabbers return to the theme, they don’t mix.

Polly Moran hasn’t much to do, which is the picture’s biggest disappointment.

The Passionate Plumber

Production

M-G-M. Director Edward Sedgwick; Screenplay Laurence E. Johnson, Ralph Spence

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1932. Running time: 73 MIN.

With

Buster Keaton Jimmy Durante Irene Purcell Polly Moran Gilbert Roland Mona Maris
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