Review: ‘No Man of Her Own’

Title is borrowed from the Val Lewton best-seller, No Bed of Her Own, which was originally bought for Clark Gable and Miriam Hopkins. After considerable trouble adapting the Lewton story for the screen and for Will Hays' okay, it was decided to turn out another story [by Edmund Goulding and Benjamin Glazer] under the No Man of Her Own title. Since then, Hopkins stamped her feet at Par and Carole Lombard was cast for the part opp Gable.

Title is borrowed from the Val Lewton best-seller, No Bed of Her Own, which was originally bought for Clark Gable and Miriam Hopkins. After considerable trouble adapting the Lewton story for the screen and for Will Hays’ okay, it was decided to turn out another story [by Edmund Goulding and Benjamin Glazer] under the No Man of Her Own title. Since then, Hopkins stamped her feet at Par and Carole Lombard was cast for the part opp Gable.

Gable is a swank card gyp who hits the trail heavy for the women, but in his supporting company, from Lombard down, Paramount doesn’t cheat him at all. It is largely the good cast, direction and some of the comedy arising mostly out of the wisecracks that makes No Man of Her Own acceptable film fare.

Gable was under loan to Par for this one, his first away from the Metro apron-strings.

Story revolves around a crooked gambler who marries a small-town girl on a bet and finally does time in order to clear the mud off his feet for her.

No Man of Her Own

Production

Paramount. Director Wesley Ruggles; Screenplay Maurine Watkins, Milton H. Gropper; Camera Leo Tover

Crew

(B&W) Available on VHS, DVD. Extract of a review from 1932. Running time: 75 MIN.

With

Clark Gable Carole Lombard Dorothy Mackaill Grant Mitchell George Barbier Elizabeth Patterson
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading