Scene is laid in Berlin and a discursive opening has some trick shots at a fashionable caberet that must have cost a good deal to get set. For a start it does manage to pump up an effect of gaiety as a background for Marilyn Miller's character of a discreet barmaid who has captivated a rich young man. Scene climaxes with Ben Miller and Ben Lyon doing a tango on the cabaret dance floor, which turns out to be the picture's high point.

Scene is laid in Berlin and a discursive opening has some trick shots at a fashionable caberet that must have cost a good deal to get set. For a start it does manage to pump up an effect of gaiety as a background for Marilyn Miller’s character of a discreet barmaid who has captivated a rich young man. Scene climaxes with Ben Miller and Ben Lyon doing a tango on the cabaret dance floor, which turns out to be the picture’s high point.

From that it goes into buffoonery and interest diminishes through dizzy clowning to a frenzied romantic finish, when the heroine having just married a rich old baron, announces to the lover who had just discarded her that now she was eligible to become his wife.

Picture [from a play by R. Bernaver and R. Oesterreicher] takes care of nearly all the minor details, settings, lighting, music, but ignores utterly the basic things of ingratiating story and acceptable acting. W.C. Fields does something with the role of the girl’s father, a Micawber-like character which would have counted in better surroundings.

Her Majesty Love

Production

First National. Dir William Dieterle; Screenplay Robert Lord, Arthur Caesar; Camera Robert Kurrle; Editor Ralph Dawson Art Dir Jack Okey

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1931. Running time: 75 MIN.

With

Marilyn Miller Ben Lyon W.C. Fields Ford Sterling Leon Errol Chester Conklin
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