The big scene is a crack-up of the dirigible in the air; more interesting even than the explosion of the dirigible in Hell's Angels. The remainder of Directorigible is unconvincing, before or after the crack-up, the latter occurring about midway.

The big scene is a crack-up of the dirigible in the air; more interesting even than the explosion of the dirigible in Hell’s Angels. The remainder of Directorigible is unconvincing, before or after the crack-up, the latter occurring about midway.

After the crack-up comes the South Pole expedition by plane and dirigible, the latter to resuce the survivors. As Ralph Graves piloting the airplane to the pole is ready to return, the explorer aboard wants to drop an American flag to mark the spot. Graves says no, he will land and let the explorer do it in person. ‘See that snow’, says Graves, ‘it’s perfect for landing’, and he lands, right on his neck with the others, while the plane burns. After that it’s homeward bound, 6,000 miles away and getting there at the rate of seven miles daily. Trudging, starving, dying.

Of the actors Fay Wray looks the best, earnestly sincere as the wife of Graves’ glory-seeking aviator. Graves early in the film is light enough to give the zest the story [by Commander Frank Wilber Wead, USN] needs. Jack Holt is the dirigible’s commander and pal of Graves.

Dirigible

Production

Columbia. Director Frank Capra; Producer [uncredited]; Screenplay Jo Swerling, Dorothy Howell; Camera Joseph Walker; Editor Maurice Wright; Music [uncredited]; Art Director [uncredited]

Crew

(B&W) Extract of a review from 1931. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Jack Holt Ralph Graves Fay Wray Hobart Bosworth Roscoe Karns Clarence Muse
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